After Twitter exile, Donald Trump spins Iowa loss, says self-funding ‘not worth it’

Donald Trump speaking to caucus-goers in Clive, Iowa, on Monday night.
Donald Trump speaking to caucus-goers in Clive, Iowa, on Monday night.

DES MOINES, Iowa — Part-time Palm Beacher Donald Trump was surprisingly conciliatory Monday night after finishing second to Ted Cruz in Iowa’s first-in-the-nation caucuses.

Then, the notorious nocturnal tweeter stayed off Twitter for several hours.

Trump’s Twitter stream came back to life late this morning, however, first with a pair of tweets putting a positive spin on his second-place finish:

trump initial tweets

Then came two tweets taking issue with the way he’s been covered in the media:

trump media tweets

And then came a tweet chiding “the voters” for not appreciating his personal financial investment in the race:

trump self fund

Trump put $12.8 million of his own money into the race through Dec. 31, according to his Federal Election Commission report. But he’s not the sole financier of his White House effort. The Trump campaign also logged $6.6 million in contributions through Dec. 31.

Here’s a key portion of the Trump campaign’s FEC summary sheet:

trump fec

Marco Rubio’s 4 Es in Iowa: Electability, economy, education, experience(?!)

Marco Rubio speaks to caucus-goers in Clive, near Des Moines, on Monday night.
Marco Rubio speaks to caucus-goers in Clive, near Des Moines, on Monday night.

DES MOINES — Late-deciding voters pushed Florida Sen. Marco Rubio to a strong third-place finish in Iowa on Monday, according to entrance polls.

 

Iowa counties won by Ted Cruz (gold), Donald Trump (blue) and Marco Rubio (green).
Iowa counties won by Ted Cruz (gold), Donald Trump (blue) and Marco Rubio (green).

Finishing third wasn’t a surprise, particularly after the “gold standard” Des Moines Register poll on Saturday showed Rubio as bronze medalist. But Rubio’s 23 percent showing on Monday far exceeded his 15 percent support in that poll. In all, Rubio exceeded the RealClearPolitics average of Iowa polls by 6.2 points.

 

The entrance polls show Rubio was the top Republican — by a large margin — among the 21 percent of voters who said the “ability to win in November” was the quality they valued most in a candidate. Rubio got 43 percent support from these voters, compared to 25 percent for part-time Palm Beacher Donald Trump and 23 percent for statewide winner Ted Cruz.

 

Donald Trump scored big with voters concerned about immigration -- but only 13 percent of Iowans said that was their top issue.
Donald Trump scored big with voters concerned about immigration — but only 13 percent of Iowans said that was their top issue.

Rubio also topped the Republican field among the 27 percent of voters who identified the economy and jobs as their top issue. Thirty percent of these voters picked Rubio.

 

Rubio, a cosponsor of the “Gang of 8” immigration reform bill in 2013, got only 9 percent support from voters who said immigration was their top concern. Trump, whose vow to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico has been a centerpiece of his campaign, won 45 percent of these voters — but only 13 percent of Iowa Republicans said immigration was their top issue.

 

Among the 51 percent of voters with a college degree, Rubio was the top choice with 27 percent support. Cruz was the top choice of voters without a college degree.

 

While Rubio was slammed by Jeb Bush and others as inexperienced for serving only one term in the U.S. Senate, he was the top choice of Republicans who said “experience in politics” is the best preparation for being president. Among these voters, who were 45 percent of the GOP electorate, Rubio got 39 percent support.

 

Among voters who said being from “outside the political establishment” was the best preparation, Trump got 46 percent support and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson of West Palm Beach got 18 percent.

 

More than one-third of Republican voters said they decided on a candidate within the last week. Of the 16 percent who decided on caucus day, Rubio was the top choice with 27 percent. For those who made their choice “in the last few days,” Rubio topped the GOP field with 31 percent support.

 

 

 

 

Up-close pics from an Iowa caucus with Rubio, Trump, Carson, Santorum

Marco Rubio, with his wife and four children, waits to speak to caucus-goers in Clive, Iowa, on Monday night.
Marco Rubio, with his wife and four children, waits to speak to caucus-goers in Clive, Iowa, on Monday night.

 

CLIVE, Iowa — Two big Republican precincts held their caucuses at the 7 Flags Event Center in this suburb of Des Moines.

 

Here's what an actual Iowa caucus ballot looks like.
Here’s what an actual Iowa caucus ballot looks like.

The volume of voters and proximity to the city where most campaigns were based led Marco Rubio, Donald Trump, Ben Carson and Rick Santorum to visit on Monday night and make their appeals directly to caucus-goers.

 

Clive Precincts 3 and 4 ended up going big for Rubio.

 

The Florida senator got 363 of the 889 votes cast — a whopping 40.8 percent. Trump got 165 votes or 18.6 percent. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, the statewide winner, got 146 votes or 16.4 percent.

 

Read more about the scene in Clive at MyPalmBeachPost.com.

 

Rubio showed up early and shook a lot of hands.
Rubio showed up early and shook a lot of hands.

020116 rubio old guy

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, speaking on behalf of Ted Cruz, chats with Rubio offstage.
Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, speaking on behalf of Ted Cruz, chats with Rubio offstage.
With his family providing a photogenic backdrop, Rubio made a five-minute speech to caucus-goers.
With his family providing a photogenic backdrop, Rubio made a five-minute speech to caucus-goers.
A backstage view of Rubio's speech.
A backstage view of Rubio’s speech.
Ben Carson railed against political correctness in his speech.
Ben Carson railed against political correctness in his speech.
Donald Trump prepares to take the stage.
Donald Trump prepares to take the stage in Clive.
Trump makes his case.
Donald Trump makes his case.
Trump-o-rama
Trump-o-rama
Trump shakes some hands on his way out.
Trump shakes some hands on his way out.
Rick Santorum, the narrow winner of the 2012 Iowa GOP caucuses, makes a sweater-vested appeal.
Rick Santorum, the narrow winner of the 2012 Iowa GOP caucuses, makes a sweater-vested appeal.
Counting the ballots from one precinct.
Counting the ballots.
More ballot-counting. Stacks of paper piled next to each candidate's handwritten name. What could possibly go wrong?
More ballot-counting. Stacks of paper piled next to each candidate’s handwritten name. What could possibly go wrong?
"Brews & Booze" sign not a fixture at most voting sites.
“Brews & Booze” sign not a fixture at most voting sites.

Bid to hike Palm Beach Port commissioners’ salaries faces rough seas

Effort to boost salaries for Port of Palm Beach commissioners facing rough seas
Effort to boost salaries for Port of Palm Beach commissioners facing rough seas

A proposal that would almost double the pay of Port of Palm Beach commissioners cleared a House panel Monday but appears likely to face rough seas in the Legislature.

Port of Palm Beach commissioners, who are elected to the part-time post, earn $9,500 annually – a rate that is unchanged since 1999.

The legislation (HB 1437) by Reps. Bill Hager, R-Boca Raton, and Bobby Powell, D-Riviera Beach, would boost the salary to $16,000-a-year, and allow for 3 percent annual increases after that.

Powell told the Local Government Affairs subcommittee that port business is booming under the five-member district’s leadership since the last pay raise.

“They’ve increased the amount of business they do three times since that time,” Powell said. “It’s a very important position.”

Lawmakers, however, were skeptical.

“I’m not sure the $16,000 is the appropriate number,” said Rep. Charlie Stone, R-Ocala.

Rep. Jennifer Sullivan, R-Mount Dora, also questioned why 3 percent annual increases would be allowed under the bill, a local measure which has the support of the Palm Beach County legislative delegation.

The port’s taxing district takes in West Palm Beach, Riviera Beach and the county’s northern tier. Established in 1915, the district hasn’t levied taxes since 1974, pulling in its more than $26 million in revenue through rents, royalties and service charges on port business.

House committee members, however, generally struggled with how much pay was fair for Palm Beach County’s elected port commissioners, with debate taking on a ‘Goldilocks’ quality.

Scott joins Seminoles to tout expansion plans — if gambling deal is OK’d

Gov. Rick Scott
Gov. Rick Scott

Gov. Rick Scott joined leaders of the Seminole Tribe in unveiling plans Monday for a $1.8 billion expansion at casinos in Hollywood and Tampa — if a new gambling compact is approved by lawmakers.

Scott has negotiated a compact that could bring the state $3 billion over the next seven years. The deal would open the door to slots at Palm Beach Kennel Club, which has been clamoring for the machines for years.

The compact also would allow the tribe to continue banked card games, like blackjack, at seven casinos — up from five currently — while also adding craps and roulette.

While getting a presentation from the tribe on the massive upgrades planned for Seminole casinos in Hollywood and Tampa — grottoes, underwater lounges, luxury swimming pools and major hotel renovations — Scott kept his sales pitch low-key.

“We worked hard with you all to get this signed,” Scott told Seminole Tribe Chairman James Billie and other tribal council leaders. “Now it’s up to the Legislature.”

Jim Allen, CEO of Seminole Hardrock Entertainment, told Scott, “We don’t know of another economic engine that has generated this kind of activity.”

In the meeting at Seminole Tribal headquarters in Hollywood, Scott appeared to send a few signals to lawmakers, urging action on the compact this session.

As a series of business leaders told him about the jobs and revenue generated by their work at the current casino and plans for expansion once the compact kicks in, Scott got each to concede their lofty future plans wouldn’t happen — if the compact is left on the table.

Donors ante up $1.2 million in quarter for race to replace Patrick Murphy

Perkins
Perkins

The nine Republicans and four Democrats running in a nationally watched race to replace Rep. Patrick Murphy, D-Jupiter, collected more than $1.2 million in contributions during the last quarter of 2015, new reports show.

 

Federal Election Commission reports for the final quarter of 2015 were due Sunday, but several candidates had already released figures earlier in January.

Leading the Democratic money race in Palm Beach-Treasure Coast District 18 is businessman Randy Perkins, who raised $427,500 after announcing his candidacy in November. Perkins also put in $1 million of his own money and began 2016 with nearly $1.4 million in available cash.

Mast
Mast

On the Republican side, Army special ops combat vet Brian Mast had the best quarter, collecting $291,711 from donors. Mast began 2016 with $327,647 in campaign cash. Martin County school board member Rebecca Negron began the year with slightly more money — $337,032.

 

Here’s a list of what candidates raised in the fourth quarter and how much cash on hand they had to begin 2016:

 

Candidate                   4th quarter       Cash on hand

Democrats

Jonathan Chane         $104,227            $287,631

Randy Perkins            $427,500          $1,365,494    (includes $1 million from self)

Priscilla Taylor              $39,639            $115,212

John (Juan) Xuna              $665                    $665

Republicans

Carl Domino                         $600            $280,172    (includes $308,000 from self)

Mark Freeman                    $125       $1,160,598  (includes $1.2 million from self)

Rick Kozell                         $121,248        $221,054

Brian Mast                          $291,711         $327,647 (total of two Mast committees)

Rebecca Negron               $107,827        $337,032

Noelle Nikpour                    $55,425         $147,864

Rick Roth                             $53,100          $53,100

Paul Spain                               $1,400            $40,558   (includes $44,019 from self)

Carla Spalding                       $8,075           $2,416