National GOP rejects rules change

Solomon Yue, an RNC committeeman from Oregon, wants Republican convention rules changed to make it harder for a "fresh face" to be nominated.
Solomon Yue, an RNC committeeman from Oregon, wants Republican convention rules changed to make it harder for a “fresh face” to be nominated.

UPDATE:

At its quarterly meeting in Hollywood, the Republican National Committee Thursday rejected a change that its sponsor said would make it more difficult for party elites to bring in a “fresh face” to seek the nomination at the convention.

Solomon Yue, a RNC committeeman from Oregon, has proposed that the GOP convention use Roberts Rules of Order instead of Congressional rules.

The House of Representatives rules, which have been used at past conventions, give more latitude to the convention’s presiding officer — expected to be House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis. — to open nominations to consider other candidates if no candidate wins on the first ballot. Under Roberts Rules, such a scenario would require a majority of convention delegates to agree.

While agreeing his proposal would make it tougher for anyone other than the delegate leader, part-time Palm Beacher Donald Trump, or Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, to be considered for the nomination, Yue said he’s neutral in the race and is only trying to bring transparency to the process.

Not changing rules, Yue said, “will blow up this convention as well as the party, as well as cause us to lose, in November, the White House spot.”

Yue, a refugee from Communist China, cited the images of U.S. helicopters evacuating people from the American embassy in Saigon at the fall of South Vietnam.

“If we don’t do it right, and we lose this election, there won’t be a chopper for you and me,” Yue said.

Randy Evans, from Georgia, was opposed.

“We’re basically changing the rules in the seventh inning of the ball game,” Randy Evans of Georgia said. “I don’t think it’s right that you change the rules.”

Republicans meet in South Florida amid Trump rules fight

 

Cgkrfw2WYAAXDhO.jpg-largeHOLLYWOOD, Fla. — National Republicans gathering today in South Florida are wrestling with what rules will apply in August in Cleveland when it votes for its nominee.

Front runner, and part-time Palm Beacher, Donald Trump, is far ahead, but might not reach the 1,237 delegates needed to win on the first ballot.

The two men who hope to step in if a failed first ballot leads to a free-for-all second vote, Texas U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, came Wednesday to the RNC’s quarterly meeting. at the Diplomat in Hollywood to woo members in hopes of wrestling the nomination from Trump.

Trump has said the Cruz and Kasich scenarios are evidence of a system “rigged” against him by the GOP establishment. Amid Trump’s constant criticism, RNC Chairman Reince Priebus and many of the party officials here appeared skittish about taking any action that might smack of favoritism toward a candidate.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott is set to address the meeting at midday followed by the rules committee meeting.

This morning, the Democratic National Committee, in advance of a press call by DNC Chair Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz and U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, said, “with Republicans all over the map pledging to skip this summer’s Republican Convention, it’s clear the GOP is in a full-scale freak-out.”

Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Ted Cruz, John Kasich react to Brussels terror attacks

UPDATED: The 2016 presidential candidates are sharing their thoughts in the wake of deadly terror attacks in Brussels, Belgium, earlier this morning.

A view of bomb damage as passengers are evacuated from Zaventem Bruxelles International Airport after a terrorist attack on March 22, 2016 in Brussels, Belgium. (Photo by Sylvain Lefevre/Getty Images)
A view of bomb damage as passengers are evacuated from Zaventem Bruxelles International Airport after a terrorist attack on March 22, 2016 in Brussels, Belgium. (Photo by Sylvain Lefevre/Getty Images)

Republican front-runner Donald Trump shared a brief response on his Facebook page, saying Brussels once was “beautiful and safe” but now “it is from a different world.”

In a call to the “Fox & Friends” TV show, Trump hearkened back to his proposal to ban all Muslims from coming into the United States.

» RELATED: Local airports ramp security as flights canceled after Belgium attacks

» GALLERY: Explosions in Brussels

“We have to be smart in the United States when people come in,” Trump said. “We’re taking in people without real documentation, we don’t know where they’re coming from. … You look at them from any standpoint, they could be ISIS, they could be ISIS-related.”

Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton issued a statement on the attacks, calling the terrorists “vicious killers.”

“These terrorists seek to undermine the democratic values that are the foundation of our alliance and our way of life, but they will never succeed,” Clinton said in the statement. “Today’s attacks will only strengthen our resolve to stand together as allies and defeat terrorism and radical jihadism around the world.”

Republican Ted Cruz also issued a statement via Facebook. He said the attacks in Brussels are “just the latest in a string of coordinated attacks by radical Islamic terrorists perpetrated by those who are waging war against all who do not accept their extreme strain of Islam.”

Cruz also mentioned President Barack Obama, though not by name: “For over seven years we have had a president who refuses to acknowledge this reality.”

Cruz added, “And the truth is, we can never hope to defeat this evil so long as we refuse to even name it. That ends on January 20, 2017, when I am sworn in as president. We will name our enemy — radical Islamic terrorism. And we will defeat it.”

Democrat Bernie Sanders issued his response later in the morning, offering his condolences to those affected by the “barbaric attacks” and to residents of Brussels.

“Today’s attack is a brutal reminder that the international community must come together to destroy ISIS. This type of barbarism cannot be allowed to continue,” Sanders said.

GOP candidate John Kasich’s statement expressed solidarity with Brussels, while calling on the international community to “redouble our efforts with our allies to identify, root our and destroy the perpetrators of such acts of evil.”

Poll: Who won the GOP debate in Miami?

The GOP debate in Miami has wrapped up, and we want to know: Who do you think was the winner?

The stage is prepared for the CNN, Salem Media Group, The Washington Times Republican Presidential Primary Debate which will feature the four remaining Republican candidates, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL), Donald Trump, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), and Ohio Gov. John Kasich on the University of Miami on March 10, 2016 in Coral Gables, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
The stage is prepared for the CNN, Salem Media Group, The Washington Times Republican Presidential Primary Debate which will feature the four remaining Republican candidates, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL), Donald Trump, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), and Ohio Gov. John Kasich on the University of Miami on March 10, 2016 in Coral Gables, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Was it Donald Trump, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio or John Kasich?

Vote in our poll below.

» RELATED: Read our full GOP debate coverage

GOP debate: Why immigration matters to Florida

In tonight’s debate, Republican presidential candidates tackled a huge issue for Floridians: immigration.

In last night’s Democratic debate, sponsored in part by Spanish-language TV channel Univision, candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders also took on immigration, discussing deportation and workers’ rights.

» RELATED: Read our full GOP debate coverage

Candidate Marco Rubio noted how his parents immigrated to the United States from Cuba.

But why is immigration so important to Floridians? And why is it such a hot issue in the presidential race?

Rafael Mejia (R) , originally from the Dominican Republic, waves an American flag as he is sworn in as a naturalized U.S. citizen, at the U.S Citizenship and Immigration Services office on December 29, 2015 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Rafael Mejia (R) , originally from the Dominican Republic, waves an American flag as he is sworn in as a naturalized U.S. citizen, at the U.S Citizenship and Immigration Services office on December 29, 2015 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Here are three things you should know about immigration in Florida.

1. About 19 percent of Floridians were born abroad.

According to the 2014 American Community Survey, Florida has a population of more than 19 million, and an estimated 3,789,829 of those people were not born in the United States. Of that number, an estimated 1,829,820 are not U.S. Citizens.

2. Even more Floridians speak a second language.

Many job-seekers in Florida will see the phrase “bilingual preferred” on job descriptions — and there’s a reason for that. According to the 2013 ACS, more than 5 million Floridians speak a foreign language.

3. Both Republicans and Democrats have made immigration a cornerstone of their campaigns.

From Marco Rubio touting his past as a child of immigrants, to Donald Trump’s wall along the Mexican border, to Bernie Sanders insisting his campaign “is listening to our brothers and sisters in the Latino community,” immigration is one of the top issues this election year — as it has been for most recent presidential elections.

———

The Palm Beach Post has done extensive reporting on immigration in Florida. Here are some of our top stories:

• Why was Carlitos born this way?

• Pickers wade in pesticides, but training and oversight are lax

• Undocumented immigrants win big with in-state tuition, law license votes

• Case of Lake Worth immigrant teen heads to Florida Supreme Court

Train jumping: A desperate journey

• An immigrant teen’s journey from Guatemala to a West Palm art gallery

Cuba: A people divided yet united

Former candidate Santorum looks to give Rubio campaign a boost

I’ll see your Carly Fiorina and raise you with Rick Santorum. Or something like that.

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, pulling out all of the stops to win Florida’s Republican Party primary on March 15, will campaign with former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania Thursday.

Santorum endorsed Rubio after ending his own bid for the GOP nomination. U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas made a splash Wednesday morning by getting the endorsement of former candidate Carly Fiorina, which was announced on Rubio’s home turf of Miami.

Santorum will hold a press conference on national security with Rubio in Jacksonville at 10 a.m.

The Rubio campaign said the point of the joint appearance is to “expose Donald Trump’s lack of understanding of the national security challenges we face as a nation.”

At noon, Rubio is scheduled to appear at a Southeast Volusia County GOP luncheon at the Smyrna Yacht Club.

Santorum will drop by a Rubio’s phone bank in Jacksonville at 6 p.m., not long before the  GOP debate in Miami.

Rick Santorum
Rick Santorum

Texas Congressman to stump for Hillary; farmworkers decry GOP

Joaquin_Castro,_official_portrait,_113th_Congress
Castro

On the morning after tonight’s Democratic debate, Hillary Clinton will get some help from Texas Congressman Joaquin Castro .

Castro will be stumping for the front-runner at noon at a Miami phone bank.

Around the same time, a group called “Latino Victory Fund” will hold a roundtable at 1 p.m. in Coral Gables.

The group will discuss “ (Donald) Trump, (Ted) Cruz and (Marco) Rubio’s policies; their hateful rhetoric against immigrants, working families and Latinos; and their negative effect on the Hispanic community,” farm-worker leader Dolores Huerta said in an advisory.

New poll: Trump crushing Rubio in must-win Florida

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio is telling supporters he will defeat celebrity mogul Donald Trump in Florida’s March 15 primary and go on to be the Republican Party’s presidential nominee.

A new Quinnipiac University poll is delivering a very different message.

That new poll shows Trump is crushing Rubio in Florida, getting the support of 45 percent of likely voters compared to 22 percent for Rubio. U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas gets 18 percent in the poll, and Ohio Gov. John Kasich is at 8 percent.

Rubio has fared poorly so far in the presidential nominating contests, winning only in Minnesota and Puerto Rico. A loss in his home state would likely end his quest for the presidency.

A Quinnipiac poll of likely voters in Florida released on February 25 showed Trump leading Rubio with 44 percent compared to 28 percent for Rubio.

Quinnipiac has shown the race for Florida to be a blowout. A Monmouth University poll released on Monday showed Rubio trailing Trump by 8 percentage points.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a press conference Saturday night at Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach. (Bill Ingram / The Palm Beach Post)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a press conference Saturday night at Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach. (Bill Ingram / The Palm Beach Post)

Poll: Who won the fourth GOP debate?

(Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

The fourth GOP debate of the presidential primary season is over, and we want to know: Who do you think was the winner?

Vote in our poll below.

You can also check out a recap of our live chat, read Post reporter John Kennedy’s five takeaways from the fourth debate or check out the results of our poll on the third GOP primary debate.

Poll: Who won the third GOP debate?

(Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

The third GOP debate of the presidential primary season is over, and we want to know: Who do you think was the winner?

Vote in our poll below.

You can also check out a recap of our live chat, or check out the results of our poll on the second GOP debate.