NEW: Frankel, Democratic women to wear white during Trump speech

U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel will join a group of Democratic congresswomen in wearing white — a show of support for women’s rights — to President Donald Trump’s first address before a joint session of Congress.

The move by the House Democratic Women’s Working Group, for which Frankel serves as chair, mirrors a similar demonstration from Trump’s inaugural, when Frankel and several other Democrats wore pink. White was chosen because it was the official color of the suffragette movement, the group said in a news release.

U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel, left, is joined by other Democratic House members in wearing pink as a peaceful protest of President Donald Trump's inauguration. (Provided)
U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel, left, is joined by other Democratic House members in wearing pink as a peaceful protest of President Donald Trump’s inauguration. (Provided)

» LIVE UPDATES: President Trump’s speech before Congress

“We wear white to unite against any attempts by the Trump Administration to roll back the incredible progress women have made in the last century, and we will continue to support the advancement of all women. We will not go back,” said Frankel, whose District 21 is composed of much of central and southern Palm Beach County, including Trump’s Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach.

Frankel’s guest for the address tonight is Treasure Coast resident Sherry Riggs, who credits the Affordable Care Act with saving her life. Lawmakers typically receive one guest ticket each to presidential speeches.

» COMPLETE COVERAGE: Donald Trump in Palm Beach

 

NEW: ‘A star is born,’ says Trump of Boynton Beach man at rally

President Donald Trump with Boynton Beach resident Gene Huber at a Saturday rally in Melbourne. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
President Donald Trump with Boynton Beach resident Gene Huber at a Saturday rally in Melbourne. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

MELBOURNE — The man President Donald Trump summoned from the crowd at his Saturday rally is a Boynton Beach car salesman who keeps a life-size cardboard cutout of Trump at his house and regularly praises Trump on social media.

 

Gene Huber of Boynton Beach talks to reporters as friends Kevin Rebal of Pompano Beach and Guy Fitzpatrick of Port St. Lucie look on.
Gene Huber of Boynton Beach talks to reporters as friends Kevin Rebal of Pompano Beach and Guy Fitzpatrick of Port St. Lucie look on.

Gene Huber, 47, became an instant political everyman celebrity Saturday when Trump spotted him in the crowd and, saying he recognized him from a TV interview, asked him to come on stage and speak to the estimated 9,000 people in a hangar at Orlando-Melbourne International Airport.

 

After Secret Service agents were told by the president to let him on stage, Huber bounded up and hugged the president, who encouraged him to say a few words.

 

“Mr. President, thank you, sir. We the people, our movement, is the reason why our president of the United States is standing in front of us today. When President Trump during the election promised all these things that he was going to do for us, I knew he was going to do this for us,” Huber said.

 

“A star is born,” Trump said as Huber left the stage and the crowd chanted “U.S.A! U.S.A!”

 

Huber had done TV interviews earlier Saturday proclaiming his support for Trump after showing up at 4 a.m. to be first in line for the 5 p.m. rally.

 

 

On Twitter, Huber’s profile picture shows him with a cardboard cutout of Trump.

 

Gene Huber posted this picture of himself on Twitter with a cardboard Trump cutout.
Gene Huber posted this picture of himself on Twitter with a cardboard Trump cutout.

“I’ve got a 6-foot cardboard box of President Trump in my house and I salute that every single day, and I pray and tell him ‘Mr. President, I prayed for your safety today.’ And I’m not lying. I do that every single day to the president, but its cardboard,” Huber told CNN in an interview after the rally.

 

CNN is often criticized by Trump and his supporters. At the end of his interview, Huber said: “I appreciate the interview, let’s just be a little, little nicer to our president.”

 

Huber was also interviewed by Fox News Saturday night after the rally.

 

He also appeared this morning on Fox and Friends — and said he’s already hearing suggestions that his Saturday appearance with the president wasn’t genuine.

 

Gene Huber of Boynton Beach appears on Fox and Friends this morning.
Gene Huber of Boynton Beach appears on Fox and Friends this morning.

“I just want everyone to know this as well: I’m hearing from the left that this was planted, that President Trump made this to happen on purpose, like we set this up. No, it didn’t. It did not happen,” Huber said this morning on Fox and Friends.

 

“President Trump, I want to thank you so much for that opportunity that you did for me. That just shows us, we the people and our movement, that you care about us, the American people,” Huber said at the end of his interview.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lois Frankel: Women’s March a sign to Trump that ‘women are watching’

When U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel attends the Women’s March on Washington on Jan. 21, she’ll stand alongside dozens of women from her district, which includes much of central and southern Palm Beach County.

The Democratic representative and former West Palm Beach mayor is slated to go to the rally after attending President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration on Friday, then co-hosting a breakfast Saturday morning to welcome Women’s March attendees from Florida.

Congresswoman (center) Lois Frankel hosts a roundtable discussion with local officials of Palm Beach County about the region's opioid epidemic, December 10, 2016 in Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce. (Yuting Jiang / The Palm Beach Post)
Congresswoman (center) Lois Frankel hosts a roundtable discussion with local officials of Palm Beach County about the region’s opioid epidemic, December 10, 2016 in Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce. (Yuting Jiang / The Palm Beach Post)

Frankel spoke to The Palm Beach Post earlier this week about her participation and support for the rally, which organizers say could draw 200,000 people.

RELATED: Latest news on Donald Trump’s inauguration

“We want to send a message to our new government on the first day in office that women’s rights are human rights, that we are standing together recognizing that defending the most marginalized among us is defending all of us,” Frankel said. “It is to be peaceful. That’s what our democracy should be about — making our voices heard, standing up for our safety, our rights, our families.”

Frankel said she thinks there is “a lot of fear” among women that the incoming administration could lead to women losing access to health care, including services provided by Planned Parenthood and benefits available under the Affordable Care Act.

“This is a productive way for people to channel their anxiety in a peaceful way with a strong message to not only the president-elect but to the Congress that will be there, that we are watching, that women are watching, that we are on our toes and we care very deeply about our country and our rights,” Frankel said.

Read more about Palm Beach County residents attending the Women’s March on Washington.

 

 

 

Palm Beach County men to perform in Donald Trump’s inaugural parade

The Presidential Inaugural Committee on Friday announced an initial lineup of groups set to perform in President-elect Donald Trump’s inaugural parade on Jan. 20.

From marching bands to dance groups, there are more 40 organizations composed of more than 8,000 people on the list, the committee said in a news release. No Palm Beach County groups are on the initial list, but one group slated to perform does include two Palm Beach County residents.

Employees of the Architect of the Capitol put up a fence at the West Front of the Capitol as construction of the 2017 presidential inaugural platform continues December 8, 2016 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Employees of the Architect of the Capitol put up a fence at the West Front of the Capitol as construction of the 2017 presidential inaugural platform continues December 8, 2016 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

» RELATED: Donald Trump’s New Year’s Eve party: Stallone, other celebs to attend

John Fischer of Delray Beach will play the bagpipes with the Coastal Florida Police & Fire Pipes & Drums, he told The Palm Beach Post earlier this month. J.T. Kavanagh of Delray Beach Fire Rescue also will perform with the group, playing the snare drum.

“I’m very patriotic and I love my country,” Fischer previously told The Post. “This is definitely a bucket-list item.”

Read more about Fischer from The Post’s Lulu Ramadan.

Here’s the full list of groups set to perform in the parade. In addition to these groups, the committee said each branch of the military also will be represented.

• 1st Cavalry Division Horse Cavalry Detachment – Fort Hood, Texas
• 1st Infantry Commanding General’s Mounted Color – Ft. Riley, Kansas
• Boone County Elite 4-H Equestrian Drill Team – Burlington, Kentucky
• Caisson Platoon, Fort Myer – Fort Myer, Virginia
• Cleveland Police Mounted Unit – Cleveland, Ohio
• Coastal Florida Police & Fire Pipes & Drums – Palm Coast, Florida
• Columbus North High School Band – Columbus, Indiana
• Culver Academy Equestrian – Culver, Indiana
• First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
• Fishburne Military School Army JROTC Caissons Battalion – Fishburne, Virginia
• Frankfort High School Band – Ridgeley, West Virginia
• Franklin Regional High School Panther Marching Band – Murrysville, Pennsylvania
• Indianapolis Metro Police Motorcycle Drill Team – Indianapolis, Indiana
• Kids Overseas – Richmond Hill, Georgia
• Lil Wranglers – College Station, Texas
• Marist College Band – Poughkeepsie, New York
• Merced County Sheriff’s Posse – Hilmar, California
• Michigan Multi-Jurisdictional Mounted Police Drill Team & Color Guard – Ann Arbor, Michigan
• Mid America Cowgirls Rodeo Drill Team – New Buffalo, Michigan
• Nassau County Firefighters Pipes & Drums – East Meadow, New York
• North Carolina Vietnam Helicopter Pilots Association – Hillsborough, North Carolina
• NYPD Emerald Society Pipes & Drums – East Moriches, New York
• Olivet Nazarene University – Bourbonnais, Illinois
• Palmetto Ridge High School Band – Naples, Florida
• Russellville High School Band – Russellville, Arkansas
• Talladega College Band – Talladega, Alabama
• Texas State University Strutters – San Marcos, Texas
• The Citadel Regimental Band & Pipes and Summerall Guards – Charleston, South Carolina
• The Freedom Riders – Kersey, Colorado
• Tragedy Assistance Marching Unit – Arlington, Virginia
• Tupelo High School Band – Tupelo, Mississippi
• University of Tennessee Marching Band – Knoxville, Tennessee
• VMI Corps of Cadets – Lexington, Virginia
• West Monroe High School Marching Band – West Monroe, Louisiana
• American Veterans – National
• Boy Scouts of America – National
• US Customs and Border Protection Office of Field Operations – National
• Disabled American Veterans – National
• US Border Patrol Pipes & Drums – National
• Wounded Warriors – National

Get the latest on the transition with our Countdown to the Inauguration.

 

 

 

Next stop for Irv Slosberg: Tallahassee office for Slosberg Foundation

Even not winning his re-election bid can’t keep former state Rep. Irv Slosberg out of Tallahassee.

Slosberg said Friday he will go to Florida’s Capitol to represent the Dori Slosberg Foundation — a nonprofit he founded after his daughter was killed in a violent car crash in Boca Raton 20 years ago — before the state Legislature.

Irv Slosberg speaks at the Dori Saves Lives "Staying Alive on Florida's Roadways," event in Boynton Beach on June 4, 2015. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
Irv Slosberg speaks at the Dori Saves Lives “Staying Alive on Florida’s Roadways,” event in Boynton Beach on June 4, 2015. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

Florida state law bans former legislators from representing another person, organization or business for compensation for two years following their departure from office. But Slosberg says he’s received the thumbs-up from the Florida Commission on Ethics, which can make exceptions to the law on a case-by-case basis.

Speaking at a Slosberg Foundation event on Friday in Boca Raton, Slosberg said working with the foundation in Tallahassee will allow him to continue working to improve traffic safety in Florida.

“We’re ready to fight, because unfortunately that’s what this takes,” he said.

The foundation’s new office will open Jan. 1 on Monroe Street in Tallahassee, giving the foundation “headquarters both in Boca Raton and Tallahassee,” Slosberg noted.

» RELATED: Mother’s powerful story will make you think twice about driving drunk or high

 

Rader: ‘Kevin Rader scared Irv Slosberg out of the seat.’

Rep. Kevin Rader
Rep. Kevin Rader
State Rep. Irv Slosberg
State Rep. Irv Slosberg

Rep. Kevin Rader (D-Delray Beach) showed off some muscle when he met with The Palm Beach Post Editorial Board on Thursday to answer questions about his campaign for state Senate District 29.

Literally.

When The Post’s board asked Rader why he thought State Rep. Irving Slosberg (D-Boca Raton) switched campaigns at the last minute, Rader said, “He was scared to run against me.”

And then he flexed his muscle.

“The only thing I can attribute that to is the strength and muscle of Kevin Rader scared Irv Slosberg out of the seat,” Rader said, lifting up his arm.

Here’s some background: Slosberg, who is now running for state Senate District 31, first opened a campaign against Rader in state Senate District 29 but switched at the last minute. Now Slosberg is running against State Sen. Jeff Clemens (D-Atlantis) and Emmanuel Morel, and Rader is running against Mindy Koch.

“That is such a stupid quote,” Slosberg said over the phone.

And it’s false, he added.

“My office is in District 31 and I probably represent more of District 31 than I do of 29. That’s the bottom line. I’ve been in my office there for six years. We’ve had like thousands of constituents come up.”

“When I looked at District 29, I’ve never been with people in the Glades. I’ve never represented people in Wellington. I’ve never represented the community in Coconut Creek, Wynmoor. I never represented Parkland. I never represented Coral Springs. At the end of the day, most of 29, I’ve never represented those people,” he said for why he made the last-minute decision to swap races.

Ted Deutch to speak during Democratic National Convention tonight

U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Boca Raton, will speak tonight during the final session of the Democratic National Convention.

U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch speaks to Florida's Democratic delegates on Wednesday morning. (Kristina Webb / The Palm Beach Post)
U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch speaks to Florida’s Democratic delegates on Wednesday morning. (Kristina Webb / The Palm Beach Post)

Deutch, whose campaign estimated he could speak as early as 4:30 p.m., said he plans to talk about several topics including early voting and his family.

The speech will be about “the importance of this campaign to me as a son and a father,” he said, adding that this is the first year his twin daughters, 20 years old, and his son, 18, will be able to vote.

Deutch said the chance to speak on the final night of the convention is “an amazing opportunity,” and that when Hillary Clinton’s campaign called to ask if he would participate, “It was an easy yes.”

Deutch is running for re-election in Florida’s recently redrawn District 22, which includes Highland Beach, Boca Raton, Margate and Fort Lauderdale.

Orlando nightclub shooting: Deutch to call for closing gun loophole

U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Boca Raton, said in a statement on his Facebook page that tomorrow, as Congress returns to Washington, D.C., he is going to call for closure of a loophole that allows people on the terror watchlist to purchase firearms.

An injured man is escorted out of the Pulse nightclub after a shooting rampage, Sunday morning June 12, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. A gunman wielding an assault-type rifle and a handgun opened fire inside a crowded gay nightclub early Sunday, killing at least 50 people before dying in a gunfight with SWAT officers, police said. It was the deadliest mass shooting in American history. (AP Photo/Steven Fernandez)
An injured man is escorted out of the Pulse nightclub after a shooting rampage, Sunday morning June 12, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. A gunman wielding an assault-type rifle and a handgun opened fire inside a crowded gay nightclub early Sunday, killing at least 50 people before dying in a gunfight with SWAT officers, police said. It was the deadliest mass shooting in American history. (AP Photo/Steven Fernandez)

Deutch’s statement comes in the wake of the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history, which took place early Sunday morning in Orlando at the Pulse nightclub.

» RELATED: Get the latest updates on the Orlando nightclub shooting

Read his full statement below:

“When violence strikes our community, we must stand together in solidarity with those whose lives have been forever changed – fifty families who now have a hole that will never be filled, and over fifty more whose injuries and trauma will affect them from this day forward. After the deadliest mass shooting in American history, I feel so deeply for these families, the city of ‪#‎Orlando‬, our state of Florida, and our nation. I stand with the LGBT community this Pride month and whenever members of the community face violence, hatred or discrimination. And I am so grateful for the SWAT team, the police, paramedics and firefighters whose heroic actions saved lives.

“I offer sympathy, prayers and strength. I am sure we all do. But I’m also a Member of Congress, and thoughts and prayers alone are not a sufficient response. Tomorrow, upon our return to Washington, we will be briefed about terror threats and radical Islamic violence. We will strengthen our resolve to defeat ISIS. We will continue to fight terrorism here and around the world.

“But that’s not enough. We’re mourning the deadliest mass shooting, and the American people expect us to battle terrorism, stand with the LGBT community AND to address the gun violence epidemic that plagues the country. Silence is not an option.

“TOMORROW, when we return to Washington, we should have moment of silence for the victims – immediately followed by a vote to close the loophole that allows people on the terror watch list to buy assault rifles – or any weapon. This isn’t politics; it’s common sense.

“In the weeks to come, we should not be afraid to ask why, when an AR-15 assault rifle is the one thing that’s common to Orlando, San Bernardino and Newtown, we allow these deadly weapons to be freely available? And why every gun purchaser isn’t subject to a background check? And why the mental health crisis is’t urgently addressed?

“We must fight terrorism. And stand with the LGBT community. And do something to stem the horrific tide of gun violence.

“We must do all of it. Now. For Orlando.”

Suburban Boca kid holds own with reporters at debate

Schilkler
Schiller

Schiller2Is that a 13-year-old grilling Florida governor Rick Scott?

“You’re never too young,” says Benjamin Schiller, standing with — ahem — much older journalists late Thursday, way past his bedtime, in the “spin room,” following the Republican debate at the University of Miami.

Schiller, from Loggers Run Middle School, west of Boca Raton, is a real live accredited journalist for Scholastic News Kids Press Corps; at 15 years, Scholastic calls it “the country’s oldest and largest student reporting program.”

Of more than 200 people, ages 10 to 14, who applied nationwide, 35 were picked, three of those in Florida. And Ben was the only one from South Florida.

Stories are published on Scholastic.com/news and some also appear  in Scholastic Classroom magazines, which are read more than 25 million students in the United States.

With his dad, attorney Bruce Schiller, serving as his go-fer, Benjamin worked the newsmakers; not just Scott but also presidential candidate and Ohio Gov. John Kasich and even journalism colleague Anderson Cooper of CNN.

Plus, last week he covered Hilary Clinton’s Super Tuesday rally, also in Miami.

“Wow. It’s Benjamin’s love. He’s been doing this for about two or three years now,” mom Julie Yates, also an attorney, said Friday morning from the Boca Raton law office she and husband Bruce share.

The last question Thursday night to Benjamin: how did the Kasich interview go?

“He said education, and that my future is safe with him,” Benjamin said. “And once I’m out of college, I’ll have a great job if he’s president.”

Benjamin’s said he’d be banging out an online article to run Friday or Saturday.

And, when pressed about who he might support for president, he gave the right answer:

“I’m a reporter!” he said. “I cannot be biased.”

Trump University: This Florida man says he lost $26,000 to course

There was a time, nearly a decade ago, when Charles Jacobson believed in Donald Trump.

That was before Jacobson spent $26,000 on a “Trump University” real estate course he says was nothing more than a scheme to make money off ordinary people hoping for tips from the celebrity mogul. That was before the bankruptcy and before a horrific medical diagnosis.

Real estate mogul Donald Trump holds a media conference announcing the establishment of Trump University May 23, 2005 in New York City. (Photo by Thos Robinson/Getty Images)
Real estate mogul Donald Trump holds a media conference announcing the establishment of Trump University May 23, 2005 in New York City. (Photo by Thos Robinson/Getty Images)

Now, Jacobson says the sound of Trump’s voice makes him “nauseous.”

And afraid.

Jacobson said he’s worried his story and the story of others who say they were victimized by Trump is emerging too late to stop him from becoming the Republican Party’s nominee and, eventually, president.

Read the full story.