U.S. Justice Department will send monitors to Palm Beach County Tuesday

As early voting begins Monday, more than 1.1 million Floridians have already voted by mail.

Palm Beach County is one of 67 voting jurisdictions in 28 states, including five Florida counties, that the U.S. Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division will monitor on Election Day, a press release said.

The agency said it will send more than 500 people to sites.

Other Florida counties: Hillsborough (Tampa), Lee (Fort Myers), Miami-Dade and Orange (Orlando.)

“Although state and local governments have primary responsibility for administering elections, the Civil Rights Division is charged with enforcing the federal voting rights laws that protect the rights of all citizens to access the ballot on Election Day,” the release said. “Since the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the department has regularly monitored elections in the field in jurisdictions around the country to protect the rights of voters.

It said lawyers also will staff a hotline starting early Tuesday: (800)-253-3931 or 202-307-2767 or TTY 202-305-0082; FAX (202) 307-3961. Email: voting.section@usdoj.gov. You also can fill out a complaint form on the department’s website.

The agency said complaints related to disruption at a polling place should be reported to local election officials –in this case the Palm Beach County Supervisor of Elections –and complaints related to violence, threats of violence or intimidation at a polling place should be reported immediately to local law enforcement and later to the Justice Department.

Countdown to Election Day 2016: What you need to know today

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Tracking the campaigns of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton

COUNTDOWN TO ELECTION DAY (Nov. 8): 0 days

Latest News

It’s Election Day. Who will win? It’s all about the map.

Right now, 12 states are battlegrounds, meaning they are either toss-ups or one candidate leads by a vulnerable margin. How these 12 states vote will help decides the winner tonight. Below are the last polls revealed in 10 of those states. Notice that Clinton is leading in almost all the surveys, but that lead has shrunk in the past week. The reason for the suspense, then, is whether Trump will carry enough momentum into today’s voting to overtake Clinton in those states.

Florida

  • Quinnipiac: Clinton +1
  • Gravis: Clinton +1
  • Trafalgar Group: Trump +4
  • Opinion Savvy: Clinton +2

Ohio

  • Emerson: Trump +7

North Carolina

  • NY Times/Siena: Tie
  • Quinnipiac: Clinton +2
  • Gravis: Clinton +1

Virginia

  • Christopher Newport Univ.: Clinton +6
  • Hampton University: Clinton +4
  • Gravis: Clinton +5

Nevada 

  • Emerson: Clinton +1Remington Research:  Trump +1

New Mexico

  • Zia Poll: Clinton +2
  • Gravis: Clinton +8

New Hampshire

  • Emerson: Clinton +1

Michigan

  • Gravis: Clinton +5
  • Trafalgar Group (R): Trump +2

Missouri

  • Emerson: Trump +6

Georgia

  • Landmark/Rosetta Stone: Trump +3

Which brings us to …

THE MAP: The red, the purple and the blue

The map below offers a visual breakdown of states that are pretty much in the blue camp and the red camp. The purple states are the ones that are either toss-ups or those that one candidate is hoping to steal from the other.

Real Clear Politics  last poll puts the electoral count at:

  • Clinton: 203 electoral votes
  • Trump: 164 electoral votes
  • Toss-ups or still within reach of a candidate: 171

A candidate must have 270 electoral votes to win.

map

LAST NATIONAL POLL RESULTS

  • Clinton leads Trump by 2.5 points, according to the Real Clear Politics average of most state and national polls. Clinton has 46.8 percent of voter support compared to Trump’s 44.3 percent.
  • Forecasts still show Clinton winning the election. FiveThirtyEight shows Clinton with a 65.5 percent chance of winning the election, while Trump has a 34.5 percent chance of victory.

Just remember: The national vote total does not determine the winner. It all comes down to the state-by-state results.

WHO’S VOTED?

More than 6.4 million Florida voters have cast ballots for Tuesday’s election between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, with Democrats so far casting 87,249 more ballots than Republicans, according to the state Division of Elections.

Through Sunday — the final day of in-person early voting — 2,558,072 Democrats had voted in person or through the mail in Florida, which was 39.85 percent of all ballots cast.

CELEB WATCH

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Latest weather forecast calls for rain in some key states

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Countdown to Election Day 2016: What you need to know today

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Tracking the campaigns of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton

COUNTDOWN TO ELECTION DAY (Nov. 8): 2 days

LATEST NEWS

With 2 days to go … a November surprise.

  • With just over 48 hours before polls start closing, the FBI has cleared Hillary Clinton in the latest email probe, saying the trove of emails that dominated the last week of the campaign amount to much ado about nothing. Clinton is slated to speak in Cleveland this afternoon and then head for Manchester, New Hampshire. In Kissimmee, Barack Obama campaigned for Clinton following a performance by singer Stevie Wonder. Her campaign has announced Clinton will be back in Michigan on Monday for the second time in four days. Why? Polls show the gap is narrowing, despite Michigan being a state that has been reliably Democrat for decades.
  • Donald Trump kept an aggressive schedule Sunday, campaigning in five states. In Minnesota, he told the country he decided to jump in the race because “our country was going to hell.” He added Tuesday’s election is “our last chance.” Before Minnesota, Trump was in Iowa. He will travel to Michigan, Pennsylvania and Virginia as well today. The stop in Michigan has particularly caught the attention of the Democrats, see below.
  • It took more than a week, but the number of votes cast by Democrats in Florida has surpassed the number of votes cast by Republicans for the first time since early voting polls opened. The number of votes cast by Hispanics in Florida so far is more than double the number cast in early voting in 2012.
  • Who’s winning? Polls are more conflicted than hurricane tracking projections with two days to go.

WHERE TO NEXT?

THE MAP: The red, the purple and the blue

State polls have been tightening all week, and depending on which survey you are looking at, as many as 11 battleground states remain in play. They include Florida, North Carolina, New Hampshire, Nevada, and Ohio. Maybe even Michigan, Georgia, Arizona, New Mexico, Iowa and Utah.  That’s a lot of states, and a lot of electoral votes.

map

LATEST POLL RESULTS

A Fox News poll puts Clinton ahead of Trump by two points, 45 percent to 43 percent.

The Los Angeles Times/USC tracking poll has Trump up by 5 points, 48 percent to 43 percent.

WHO’S VOTED?

  • More than 6.1 million Floridians have already voted in the 2016 early voting.
  • Democrats (39.59 percent) are narrowly edging Republicans (39.06 percent) in turnout, according to the latest Division of Elections statistics.
  • Palm Tran, Palm Beach County’s public transportation system, says it will offer free rides to customers with a valid voter information card on Tuesday, Nov. 8, Election Day.  The card must be presented to the bus operator when boarding to receive the free ride.  The offer is valid for all 35 routes system-wide throughout Palm Beach County for the entire day, but isn’t valid for use on Palm Tran Connection.

CELEB WATCH
Photos: Which celebrities are voting Trump, which are voting for Clinton 

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Early voting in Florida by the numbers
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Countdown to Election Day 2016: What you need to know today

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Tracking the campaigns of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton

COUNTDOWN TO ELECTION DAY (Nov. 8): 3 days

LATEST NEWS

With 3 days to go …

  • Hillary Clinton on Saturday made one last bid to clinch a win in Florida. In a rain-shortened rally at C.B. Smith Park in Broward County, Clinton mocked Trump. “He kept saying things (during the three presidential debates) like ‘Well, what have you done for 30 years?’ and I’m thinking to myself, Donald, you don’t want to go there,” Clinton said. “I would have been happy to spend all four and a half hours talking about what I did compared to what he’s done.” But her remarks lasted just about seven minutes before a downpour ended the event.
  • Donald Trump also started the day in Florida. He spoke in Tampa at the Florida State Fairgrounds, watch a replay here. There, Trump blasted Clinton’s support for Obamacare and called for restoring “honesty to our government.” And he took a shot at Clinton for “low energy.” He said: “You need a lot of energy to protect America. We do five events a day, and she goes home to sleep.” In fact, Trump is on another one-day cross country stump-a-thon on Saturday that includes stops in North Carolina, Colorado and Nevada, where he was rushed off stage by Secret Service briefly before returning to finish his speech.
  • Clinton’s running, Tim Kaine, will resemble a snowbird making Florida a virtual second home this weekend. Between today and Sunday, Kaine has four events scheduled, one each in Melbourne, Ft. Myers, and Sarasota and St. Petersburg. The latter will be Get Out The Vote event featuring a performance by Jon Bon Jovi.
  • GOP running mate Mike Pence also has a Florida weekend trip planned. He will be in Panama City on Sunday.
  • Former President Bill Clinton will be northeast Florida. His bus tour will make stops in Jacksonville and Gainesville.

What’s with the travel schedules? It’s a high stakes game of chess focused on about 11 battleground states that are either toss-ups or in which the trailing candidate could be closing the gap.

But just about all the victory combinations include Florida, hence the extreme interest in the Sunshine State from Clinton and Trump.

WHERE TO NEXT?

Looking ahead:

  • Trump comes back to Florida, no surprise, on Monday, for an event in Sarasota.
  • On Sunday, Clinton heads back to Cleveland, Ohio, and New Hampshire.
  • Also on Sunday, President Obama campaigns for Clinton in Kissimmee.
  • Is Clinton done with Florida events? The campaign’s schedule has a Miami event planned for Sunday with singer Cher. But no word on whether the candidate, or which surrogates, will attend.

 

THE MAP: The red, the purple and the blue

The field of key battleground states – including Florida, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Nevada, Ohio – is narrowing as we get closer to Nov. 8. Candidates don’t have any plans to travel to New Mexico or Arizona, for example, which got campaign attention this past week. As we get closer to Election Day, the paths to victory shrink, and the focus is on a handful or so of states.

map

LATEST POLL RESULTS

The most resounding poll on Friday is one neither candidate should want to be leading, a New York Times/CBS poll showing the widespread disgust among voters with both presidential candidates. The unprecedented unfavorable ratings in the survey: More than eight in 10 voters surveyed say the toxic campaign has left them “repulsed rather than excited.”

A Rasmussen Results White House Watch poll put Trump and Clinton in a tie, at 44 percent.

A CNN poll also tiled four states, including all-important Ohio and New Hampshire as well as Maine and Utah, toward Trump.

But a Fox News poll puts Clinton up by two points, 45 percent to Trump’s 43 percent.

WHO’S VOTED?

More than 5 million Floridians have cast their votes already. Republican voters (39.74 percent) have a slight edge over Democrats (39.71 percent).

CELEB WATCH
Photos: Which celebrities are voting Trump, which are voting for Clinton

Beyonce makes surprise appearance at Clinton event in Ohio

STORIES THAT MATTERED MOST

Donald Trump rushed off stage by Secret Service agents during Nevada speech

Hispanic voters coming out in droves in Florida

Report suggests Melania worked illegally in the U.S.

How important is Florida in the presidential race?

Is North Carolina more vital than Florida?

EXCLUSIVE: What happens to your ballot once you cast that vote

Election 2016: Do’s and Don’ts at the voting booth

CANDIDATES’ LATEST TWEETS

Countdown to Election Day 2016: What you need to know today

pols-header

Tracking the campaigns of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton

COUNTDOWN TO ELECTION DAY (Nov. 8): 4 days

LATEST NEWS

With 4 days to go …

A CNN poll is the latest election twist: It changes the status of four states and gives Donald Trump a path to 270. The map still favors Hillary Clinton but CNN’s “Road to 270” map now places New Hampshire as a battleground state, rather than in the Clinton column, and Utah more firmly in Trump’s camp.

The poll, along with others pointing to a tightened race, will up the ante on today’s candidate appearances, including:

  • The Veep candidates Florida visits. Republican running mate Mike Pence will be in Miami. And Democrat Tim Kaine will campaign in Melbourne.
  • Speaking in New Hampshire, Trump sounded key themes: hammering away at the FBI investigation of Clinton, her diplomatic failures and Obamacare “double-digit” rate increases. States in his sights: On Friday, after New Hampshire, Trump will be in Ohio and Pennsylvania.
  • Speaking in Pennsylvania, Clinton continued insisting Trump is unfit for the presidency because he lacks the right temperament. She also accused Trump of discriminating against African-Americans and Latinos in his real estate business. After Pennsylvania, she travels to Michigan.

Friday follows a momentous day for both campaigns.

WHERE TO NEXT?

  • Clinton will pay one more visit to Florida on Saturday. No word yet on details about that appearance.
  • On Saturday, Trump will barnstorm through North Carolina, Nevada and Iowa, maintaining a campaign pace and schedule that is significantly more aggressive.
  • President Obama will return to Florida on Sunday. He will speak in Kissimmee. Singer Stevie Wonder will perform at that event.

THE MAP: The red, the purple and the blue

Key battleground states – Florida, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Nevada, Wisconsin, Arizona, Ohio – are slated to get lots of campaign attention through today. However, Trump and Clinton hope to win states that have been reliably blue or red, respectively. That’s why Clinton is in Michigan today, hoping to keep that state blue, and Trump is back in Pennsylvania, a state he would love to see go red.

map

LATEST POLL RESULTS

  • Speaking of purple states, a Wall Street Journal/NBC News/Marist poll on Thursday found a dead heat between Trump and Clinton in Georgia, a state that has been red pretty much ever since Ronald Reagan beat Jimmy Carter. The poll puts Trump up on Clinton by a single point, 45 percent to 44 percent.
  • The same poll gives Trump a 5-point lead in Arizona, 45 percent to 40 percent, and in Texas by 9 percent, 49 percent to 40 percent. But losing Georgia would make Trump’s path to 270 that much harder.
  • CNN’s Poll of Polls has Clinton with a 4-point edge, 46 percent to 42 percent.

WHO’S VOTED?

CELEB WATCH
Photos: Which celebrities are voting Trump, which are voting for Clinton 

Beyonce makes surprise appearance at Clinton event in Ohio

STORIES THAT MATTERED MOST
Why North Carolina is so important in 2016
Clinton dominating TV ads in campaign’s homestretch
Democrats, Trump lawyers going to court early — and often
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CANDIDATES’ LATEST TWEETS

 

 

 

Countdown to Election Day 2016: What you need to know today

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Tracking the campaigns of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton

COUNTDOWN TO ELECTION DAY (Nov. 8): 5 days

LATEST NEWS

With 5 days to go …

The big news Thursday afternoon was Melania Trump’s speech in Pennsylvania. The appearance was her first public speech since the Republican National Convention. “It will be my honor and privilege to serve this country,” Melania Trump said of her accepting the First lady’s role if her husband is elected. “I will be an advocate for women and children.”

She spoke about her interest in addressing bullying, especially via social media. “Our culture has become too mean and too rough, especially to children and teenagers,” she said, specifically noting anonymous postings on the Internet.

“It will be one of the main focuses of my work if I am privileged enough to be your First lady,” she said.

Melania Trump’s speech overshadowed the Donald Trump-President Obama jousting in Florida.

Trump was at the Jacksonville Equestrian Center, where he again  hammered Clinton on the FBI probe. “But, remember, the system is rigged,” said Trump. “The political leadership at the Department of Justice is trying to protect Hillary Clinton.”

Also in Jacksonville, Obama spoke at the University of North Florida this afternoon.

Trump said the two passed by each other in Miami as Trump was leaving for Jacksonville and Obama was arriving for a speech at Florida International University on Thursday morning. “I see Air Force One and I say to myself, ‘I wonder who that could be?'” Trump said. “He is campaigning for ‘Crooked Hillary Clinton’ … He should be back in the office working.”

Obama started his morning campaigning for Hillary Clinton in Miami. In the speech at FIU, Obama ripped Trump for “hanging out with celebrities” while “stiffing small businesses and working people.” He also reiterated Clinton campaign attacks on Trump saying is “uniquely unqualified to be commander in chief.”

Hillary Clinton was in North Carolina this evening.

After visits from Clinton, Trump, Obama and Biden on back-to-back-to-back days, South Florida gets a respite from the presidential election heat lamp for the rest of Thursday.

WHERE TO NEXT?

Many of the battleground states in the electoral map below from 2012 are in play again this year. But there’s a twist. Some states that have been reliably red or blue could end up in play in the final days of the campaign.

So, on Friday, Clinton heads for Michigan — which has been reliable for Democrats in 1988. But Trump has upped the pressure in this core blue state, including visits by surrogates and a big TV ad buy. So Clinton is heading for Detroit. Likewise, Clinton was campaigning Wednesday in Arizona, a state that has long been a lock for Republicans.

Trump will also be in New Hampshire, another blue state he hopes to turn red, as well as in Pennsylvania for the second time this week, in Hershey on Friday.

On Saturday, Clinton returns to Florida for a public event in South Florida, according to her campaign, though the time and location have not been released yet.

Key battleground states – Florida, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Nevada, Wisconsin, Arizona, Ohio – are slated to get lots of campaign attention through the end of work week.

This map is from 2012, but the battleground states the (in yellow) are the ones being fought over again in 2016.

electoralvote

CELEB WATCH
Photos: Which celebrities are voting Trump, which are voting for Clinton 

LATEST POLL RESULTS

Four polls to keep an eye on:

A CBS/New York Times poll also shows the gap between Clinton and trump narrowing, though Clinton still leads, 45 percent to 42 percent.

The Electoral College map produced by FiveThirtyEight gives Clinton a 64.7 percent chance of surpassing the 270 vote requirement; Trump just 35.3 percent.

USA Today’s poll tracker puts Clinton ahead of Trump, 45.3 percent to 43.6 percent.

270towin.com tally of state-by-state polls has Clinton ahead today in two key battleground states: Florida and New Hampshire.

 

WHO’S VOTED?

As of Thursday morning, some 4.9 million Floridians have cast their vote. Republicans have cast 40.02 percent of those ballots. Democrats account for 39.78 percent of the votes.

STORIES THAT MATTERED MOST
Biden draws Clinton and Trump backers at PBSC, West Palm coffee shop

Trump in Miami urges supporters to ‘close the deal’ in Florida

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Donald Trump at the top of the Palm Beach County ballot? Is this rigged?

presrace-postDonald Trump has suggested the Nov. 8 election is rigged, but here in Florida, his critics might say the same thing.

After all, on ballots statewide and in Palm Beach County, the part-time Palm Beacher and Republican presidential nominee is at the top of the ballot. It’s not alphabetical. It’s not even alphabetical by party.

The answer: President’s not the only race. All down the ballot, each race has something in common: Republicans are listed first.

So what gives?

It’s all legit, according to the Florida Division of Elections. The answer lies in Section 101.151(2) of Florida Statutes.

It calls for the ballot to list picks in this order: “nominated by the political party that received the highest vote for Governor in the last general election of the Governor in this state, followed by the names of other candidates for President and Vice President of the United States who have been properly nominated.”

The most recent gubernatorial vote was of course, in 2014, when Republican Rick Scott was reelected. That puts the GOP ticket of Trump and Mike Pence first, followed by Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine, and then candidates from smaller parties.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County: We’ve resolved charity tournament fees spat with Trump golf club

When he's not golfing at his Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Donald Trump often hits the links at his Trump National Doral, where he'll hold a campaign rally on Friday.
When he’s not golfing at his Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Donald Trump often hits the links at his Trump National Doral, where he’ll hold a campaign rally on Friday.

The charity golf tournament fees spat between a golf club owned by Donald Trump’s organization and Boys and Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County has been resolved, the Clubs’ charity coordinator said Tuesday.

“Everything’s wonderful.” Mark Casale, vice president of philanthropy, told The Palm Beach Post. “It’s going to be a great event.”

He declined to talk numbers.

A Trump representative did not immediately respond Tuesday to an email inquiry.

Last week, Casale had complained to Palm Beach County elected officials and staff that the club had hit his clubs with unexpected fees that will cut into proceeds.

Trump International Golf Club, near Palm Beach International Airport, is on county land. As a condition of the original lease agreement since the facility opened in 1996, the golf club must make its links available at times for charity tournaments. This year, the charity benefits Boys and Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County and is scheduled for Monday, a day before Election Day.

Casale had said in July that his organization stood to collect $50,000 to $100,000 from the event.

But, he complained in an Oct. 25 email, “This ‘free’ event is costing us $20,000 between golf and catering fees. What we had hoped for as far as a ‘net’ income for this event has been cut in half (if we are lucky).”

To read more, go later to mypalmbeachpost.com.

Hillary Clinton at Palm Beach State: Every vote counts

On her 69th birthday, in what might be the most important state on Election Day — what else is new? — Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton told an overflowing crowd Wednesday at Palm Beach State College to vote, and make sure their friends vote, and, if possible, vote early.

Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton held an early voting rally at Palm Beach State College in Lake Worth Wednesday, October 26, 2016. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton held an early voting rally at Palm Beach State College in Lake Worth Wednesday, October 26, 2016. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

“We need to work for the next 13 days, and here in Florida, voting could not be easier,” she told a crowd in a gymnasium at the college west of Lake Worth.

Clinton staffers, quoting the local fire marshal, said the gym was at its capacity of 2,100 and overflows watched a video feed from an auxiliary room.

Clinton even directed those in the crowd who haven’t done so yet to head right from the rally to the Palm Beach County Lantana Road branch library, just three miles away. It’s one of 15 sites where early voting started Monday and runs through Nov. 6, just two days before Clinton faces off with GOP nominee, and part-time Palm Beacher, Donald Trump.

In a reference to the tumultuous 2000 presidential recount, she said, “We can’t take our foot off the gas. Every vote counts. Just ask my friend Al Gore.”

Clinton noted that already more than 200 million people nationwide, more than 50 million of those young people, have registered to vote, and 10 million nationwide already have cast ballots, “2 million of them right here in Florida.”

Clinton again attacked Trump’s refusal to say he’d respect the vote, saying, “nobody who’s ever run for president has ever said that.” She said that, as Secretary of State, she visited countries that really do rig their elections.

Clinton didn’t refer to this week’s news that premiums for the Affordable Care Act were shooting up. But State Rep. Blaise Ingoglia, chair of the Republican Party of Florida, said in a statement issued Tuesday, “On the heels of Obamacare premiums increasing at an average of 25 percent, Secretary Clinton’s visit to the Sunshine State will be a stark reminder of how big government policies like Obamacare will continue stifling our economy, restricting small business expansion and killing jobs.”

Clinton did give a shout-out to Republicans and independents who might be at her rally, saying, “It’s not just what we’re against. It’s what we’re for.”

Clinton put in a plug for U.S. Rep. and U.S. Senate candidate Patrick Murphy, who she said, unlike incumbent Marco Rubio, “has not been afraid to stand up to Donald Trump.” And she talked up Randy Perkins, who’s running for Murphy’s former seat, although she did call him “Randy Parker.”

Frankel, Deutch stump for Hillary at Palm Beach State rally

 

Frankel
Frankel

No surprise; in attendance at Wednesday’s Hillary Clinton rally at Palm Beach State College were local Democratic members of Congress Lois Frankel and Ted Deutch.

Noting today is Clinton’s birthday, Frankel said,.“we’re going to elect her as a birthday present.”

Asked about a new Bloomberg poll that, unlike other recent national surveys, puts Trump ahead, Frankel said, “we always knew Florida was going to close. That’s why Hillary’s here.”

Deutch said he wasn’t worried about the news this week that premiums for the Affordable Care Act were shooting up. He said he hasn’t heard Trump offer any alternative.